Lina & Serge: The Love and Wars of Lina Prokofiev

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt #ad - Meanwhile, serge found himself the tool of an evil regime to which he was forced to accommodate himself. Morrison’s portrait of the marriage of lina and Serge Prokofiev is the story of a remarkable woman who fought for survival in the face of unbearable betrayal and despair and of the irresistibly talented but heartlessly self-absorbed musician she married.

The contrast between lina and serge is one of strength and perseverance versus utter self-absorption, sacrifice, a remarkable human drama that draws on the forces of art, and the struggle against oppression. This account of the renowned composer’s neglected wife—including her years in a Soviet prison—is “a story both riveting and wrenching” Kirkus Reviews, starred review.

Lina & Serge: The Love and Wars of Lina Prokofiev #ad - Finally, lina was arrested and shipped off to the gulag in 1948. She devoted her life to serge and art, training to be an operatic soprano and following her brilliant husband to Stalin’s Russia. Born to a spanish father and russian mother in madrid at the end of the nineteenth century and raised in Brooklyn, Lina fell in love with a rising-star composer—and defied convention to be with him, courting public censure.

Readers will never forget the tragic drama of Lina’s life, and never listen to Serge’s music in quite the same way again. Serge prokofiev was one of the twentieth century’s most brilliant composers yet is an enigma to historians and his fans. Just as serge found initial acclaim—before becoming constricted by the harsh doctrine of socialist-realist music—Lina was at first accepted and later scorned, ending her singing career.

She would be held in captivity for eight awful years.

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Leningrad: Siege and Symphony: The Story of the Great City Terrorized by Stalin, Starved by Hitler, Immortalized by Shostakovich

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Atlantic Monthly Press #ad - For 872 days during world war ii, the German Army encircled the city of Leningrad—modern-day St. Schools and hospitals were bombarded. Against the backdrop of this catastrophe, historian Brian Moynahan tells the story of Dmitri Shostakovich, whose Seventh Symphony was first performed during the siege and became a symbol of defiance in the face of fascist brutality.

Palaces were looted and destroyed. Petersburg—in a military operation that would cripple the former capital and major Soviet industrial center. Famine raged and millions died, soldiers and innocent civilians alike. Titled “leningrad” in honor of the city and its people, the work premiered on August 9, 1942—with musicians scrounged from frontline units and military bands, because only twenty of the orchestra’s hundred members had survived.

Leningrad: Siege and Symphony: The Story of the Great City Terrorized by Stalin, Starved by Hitler, Immortalized by Shostakovich #ad - He reaches into the guts of the city to extract some humanity from the blood and darkness, and at its best Leningrad captures the heartbreak, agony and small salvations in both death and survival .  .  . Moynahan’s descriptions of the battlefield, hungry combatants, lice-ridden, which also draw from the diaries of the cold, are haunting.

The washington Post  . The “gripping story” of a nazi blockade, a russian composer, and a ragtag band of musicians who fought to keep up a besieged city’s morale The New York Times Book Review.

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The People's Artist: Prokofiev's Soviet Years

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Oxford University Press #ad - In the people's artist, simon morrison draws on groundbreaking research to illuminate the life of this major composer, deftly analyzing Prokofiev's music in light of new archival discoveries. Until now. The story he found in these documents is one of lofty hopes and disillusionment, of personal and creative upheavals.

At first, but morrison details how the bureaucratic machine ground him down with corrections and censorship forcing rewrites of such major works as Romeo and Juliet, Stalin's regime treated him as a celebrity, until it finally censured him in 1948, ending his career and breaking his health. Morrison shows that prokofiev seemed to thrive on uncertainty during his Paris years, stashing scores in suitcases, and ultimately stunning his fellow emigrés by returning to Stalin's Russia.

The People's Artist: Prokofiev's Soviet Years #ad - Sergey prokofiev was one of the twentieth century's greatest composers--and one of its greatest mysteries. Indeed, writings, morrison was the first scholar to gain access to the composer's sealed files in the Russian State Archives, correspondence, where he uncovered a wealth of previously unknown scores, and unopened journals and diaries.

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Sergei Prokofiev: A Biography

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Plunkett Lake Press #ad - Which is about as good as a musical biography gets: Robinson illuminates the artist’s character, demonstrates an easy command of Russian political and cultural history, penetrates the human significance of the music, and writes with clarity and vigor. Robinson writes with the skill of a novelist; but the story, in this instance, is true.

George martin, the opera quarterly“a splendid life, by a Slavic-studies specialist who is also a musician, of one of our century’s most popular composers. Robinson gives us more facts about prokofiev’s life than any previous biographer, and he weaves them into a story of politics, art, and romance that marvelously gathers momentum.

Sergei Prokofiev: A Biography #ad - . Sergei prokofiev: a biography traces the career of one of the most significant — and most popular — composers of the twentieth century. Using materials from previously closed archives in the ussr, from archives in paris and london, the alexander Nevsky Cantata, the biography illuminates the life and music of the prolific creator of such classics as Peter and the Wolf, the “Classical” Symphony, and interviews with family members and musicians who knew and worked with Prokofiev 1891-1953, Cinderella, Romeo and Juliet, and the Lieutenant Kizhe Suite.

One is grateful for Harlow Robinson’s Sergei Prokofiev: A Biography.

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The Brontës: Wild Genius on the Moors: The Story of a Literary Family

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Pegasus Books #ad - The tragic story of the brontë family has been told many times: the half-mad, repressive father; the drunken, drug-addicted brother; wildly romantic Emily; unrequited Anne; and “poor Charlotte. But is any of it true? these caricatures of the popular imagination were created by amateur biographers like Elizabeth Gaskell who were more interested in lurid tales than genuine scholarship.

Juliet barker’s landmark book is the first definitive history of the Brontës. The brontës is a revolutionary picture of the world’s favorite literary family. A “brilliant” biography of the brontë family, Anne, Charlotte, dispelling popular myths and revealing the true story of Emily, and their father The Independent on Sunday.

The Brontës: Wild Genius on the Moors: The Story of a Literary Family #ad - Based on firsthand research among all the Brontë manuscripts and among contemporary historical documents never before used by Brontë biographers, this book is both scholarly and compulsively readable.  . It demolishes the myths, yet provides startling new information that is just as compelling—but true.

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Auschwitz and the Allies: A Devastating Account of How the Allies Responded to the News of Hitler's Mass Murder

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RosettaBooks #ad - In auschwitz and the allies, and the fate of millions of people, through his eminent blend of exhaustive devotion to the facts and accessible, Martin Gilbert presents a comprehensive look into the series of decisions that helped shape this particular course of the war, graceful writing. Why did they wait so long? among the myriad questions of what the Allies could have done differently in World War II, understanding why it took them so long to respond to the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps—specifically Auschwitz—remains vital today.

A thorough analysis of allied actions after learning about the horrors of Nazi concentration camps—includes survivors’ firsthand accounts. Featuring twenty maps prepared specifically for this history and thirty-four photographs, along with firsthand accounts by escaped Auschwitz prisoners, Gilbert reconstructs the span of time between Allied awareness and definitive action in the face of overwhelming evidence of Nazi atrocities.

Auschwitz and the Allies: A Devastating Account of How the Allies Responded to the News of Hitler's Mass Murder #ad - An unforgettable contribution to the history of the last war. Jewish Chronicle  .

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The Clandestine History of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police: By Anonymous Members of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police

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Indiana University Press #ad - In 1942 and 1943 some of its members secretly composed this history and buried it in tin boxes. Murrow professor, emeritus, Harvard Kennedy School   “A landmark of Holocaust historiography. Slavic Review. This book details the creation and organization of the ghetto, the periodic selections of Jews to be deported and killed, the violent German attacks on the population in the summer of 1941, the labor required of the surviving Jewish population, and the efforts of the police to provide a semblance of stability.

No book i've read in recent time about the Holocaust has so moved me, evoking the utter helplessness of the Jew, the plight of the Jewish police and the cunning cruelty of the German. A substantial introduction by distinguished historian Samuel D. Remarkable .  .  . Kassow places this powerful work within the context of the history of the Kovno Jewish community and its experience and fate at the hands of the Nazis.

The Clandestine History of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police: By Anonymous Members of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police #ad - Provides a graphic and unparalleled description of the conditions under which the Jews of Kaunas tried to live and survive. The forward   as a force that had to serve two masters, both the Jewish population of the Kovno ghetto in Lithuania and its German occupiers, the Kovno Jewish ghetto police walked a fine line between helping Jews survive and meeting Nazi orders.

This is a gripping story, page by page, and it reminds us again that there but for the grace of God go we all. Marvin kalb, senior Advisor to the Pulitzer Center and Edward R.

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The Pure Land

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Canongate U.S. #ad - Thoughtful and vivid” historical novel based on the true story that inspired Madame Butterfly and Miss Saigon Publishers Weekly. Yet beneath glover’s astonishing success lies a man cut to the heart. A “lively and epic .  .  . The year is 1858. Part thrilling adventure, the pure land spans the feudal and the atomic ages, East and West, part lyrical reflection, and characterized by Spence’s pure vision”, global history and the private passions of the Scottish merchant-turned-Nagasaki tycoon and hero Sunday Herald.

His love affair with a courtesan—a woman who, unknown to him, would bear him the son for whom he had always longed—would inform a tragedy so heartrending that it would become immortal. The result is “a page-turner of the first order. Within ten years he amasses a great fortune, on the other side of the law, plays a huge role in modernizing Japan, and, brings about the overthrow of the shogun.

The Pure Land #ad - Not merely an engaging and vivid historical novel, but also a meditative work of art that is as finely honed as a samurai’s sword” The Times, London. Thomas glover is a gutsy eighteen-year-old in Aberdeen who grasps the chance of escape to foreign lands and takes a posting as a trader in Japan.

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The Betrayal

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Black Cat #ad - With the betrayal, in which paranoia infects every act, internationally acclaimed author Helen Dunmore “vividly depicts the difficulty of living by principle in a tyrannical society, and even ordinary citizens become instruments of terror” The New Yorker. Andrei, a young doctor, have forged a life together in the postwar, a nursery school teacher, and Anna, post-siege wreckage.

You don’t want to put it down.  .  .  . A “magnificent, brave, tender” novel of post-wwii russia from the author of The Siege—shortlisted for the Orwell Prize and Commonwealth Writers’ Prize The Independent on Sunday. When andrei is forced to treat the sick child of a senior secret police officer, his every move is scrutinized, making it painfully clear that his own fate—and that of his family—is bound to the child’s.

The Betrayal #ad - Trapped in an impossible game of life and death, Andrei and Anna must avoid the whispers and watchful eyes of those who will say and do anything to save themselves .  .  . But they know their happiness is precarious, like that of millions of Russians who must avoid the claws of Stalin’s merciless Ministry of State Security.

Leningrad 1952. An emotionally charged thriller, The Betrayal unfolds breathlessly and with great skill.

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Resistance: The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt #ad - No act of jewish resistance during the Holocaust fired the imagination quite as much as the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of April 1943. It was an event of epic proportions in which a group of relatively unarmed, untrained Jews managed to lead a military revolt against the Nazi war machine. Superb, moving, richly informative history.

Publishers weekly  note: some photos and maps contained in the print edition of this book have been excluded from the ebook edition. The “exhilarating” definitive account of the 1943 uprising in Poland’s capital, named a Best Book of the Year by Publishers Weekly and the Jewish Observer Los Angeles Times.

Resistance: The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising #ad - In this riveting, a holocaust scholar and survivor of the battle draws on diaries, letters, authoritative history, underground press reports, and his own personal experience to bring a landmark moment in Jewish history to life—offering “a dramatic and memorable picture of the ghetto” and showing how a vibrant culture shaped the young fighters whose defiance would have far-reaching implications for the Jewish people Library Journal.

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Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom: The True History of Shakespeare and Elizabeth

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Grove Press #ad - The plays glow with new life, exciting and real, infused with the soul of a man too long denied his inheritance. Sir derek Jacobi. One of the most scandalous and potentially revolutionary theories about the authorship of these immortal works. Mark rylance, first artistic director of shakespeare’s Globe Theatre   It is perhaps the greatest story never told: the truth behind the most enduring works of literature in the English language, perhaps in any language.

He has made me view the whole Elizabethan world afresh. Who was william shakespeare?   critically acclaimed historian charles beauclerk has spent more than two decades researching the authorship question, we would see them for what they are—shocking political works written by a court insider, he argues, someone with the monarch’s indulgence, and if the plays were discovered today, shielded from repression in an unstable time of armada and reformation.

Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom: The True History of Shakespeare and Elizabeth #ad - Shakespeare’s lost kingdom delves deep into the conflicts and personalities of Elizabethan England, as well as the plays themselves, to tell the true story of the “Soul of the Age. Beauclerk’s learned, compelling research, deep scholarship, engaging style and convincing interpretation won me completely.

But the author’s identity was quickly swept under the rug after his death. The official history—of an uneducated merchant writing in near obscurity, and of a virginal queen married to her country—dominated for centuries. A book for anyone who loves Shakespeare .  .

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