The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic–and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

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Riverhead Books #ad - As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time. But lacking the infrastructure-garbage removal, sewers-necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, clean water, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure.

A national bestseller, and paean to city life, detective story, a new york Times Notable Book, and an Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year   “By turns a medical thriller, Johnson's account of the outbreak and its modern implications is a true page-turner. The washington Post“Thought-provoking.

The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World #ad - Entertainment weekly it's the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. In a triumph of multidisciplinary thinking, the rise of cities, and the nature of scientific inquiry, Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories of the spread of disease, offering both a riveting history and a powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.

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Pandemics: A Very Short Introduction Very Short Introductions

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Oxford University Press #ad - Today, medicine is able to control all of these diseases, yet some of them are still devastating in much of the developing world. By assessing the relationship between poverty and disease and the geography of epidemics, McMillen offers an outspoken and thought-provoking point of view on the necessity for global governments to learn from past experiences and proactively cooperate to prevent any future epidemic.

Extremely interesting from a medical standpoint, the study of pandemics also provides unexpected, broader insights into culture and politics. This very short introduction describes history's major pandemics - plague, malaria, influenza, tuberculosis, smallpox, cholera, and HIV/AIDS - highlighting how each disease's biological characteristics affected its pandemic development.

Pandemics: A Very Short Introduction Very Short Introductions #ad - Mcmillen provides a concise yet comprehensive account of pandemics throughout human history, at the same time, illustrating how pandemic disease has shaped history and, social behavior has influenced pandemic disease. Mcmillen discusses state responses to pandemics, such as quarantine, and pays special attention to the rise of public health and the explosion of medical research in the wake of pandemics, travel restrictions, isolation, and other forms of social control, especially as the germ theory of disease emerged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

. Christian W. The 2014 ebola epidemic demonstrated the power of pandemics and their ability not only to destroy lives locally but also to capture the imagination and terrify the world.

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The American Plague

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Berkley #ad - In this account, a journalist traces the course of yellow fever, stopping in 1878 Memphis to "vividly evoke the Faulkner-meets-'Dawn of the Dead' horrors, "*-and moving on to today's strain of the killer virus. There, they launched one of history's most controversial human studies. Capital, and altered the outcome of wars.

. During a single summer in memphis alone, it cost more lives than the Chicago fire, the San Francisco earthquake, and the Johnstown flood combined. Over the course of history, halted commerce, yellow fever has paralyzed governments, quarantined cities, moved the U. S. Sent three doctors to Cuba to discover how yellow fever was spread.

The American Plague #ad - In 1900, the U. S. Compelling and terrifying, the american Plague depicts the story of yellow fever and its reign in this country-and in Africa, where even today it strikes thousands every year. With "arresting tales of heroism, "** it is a story as much about the nature of human beings as it is about the nature of disease.

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The Chimp and the River: How AIDS Emerged from an African Forest

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Excerpted and adapted from the book spillover, as he unravels the mysteries of when, Quammen's hair-raising investigation tracks the virus from chimp populations in the jungles of southeastern Cameroon to laboratories across the globe, where, with a new introduction by the author, and under what circumstances such a consequential "spillover" can happen.

The Chimp and the River: How AIDS Emerged from an African Forest #ad - . In this "frightening and fascinating masterpiece" Walter Isaacson, David Quammen explores the true origins of HIV/AIDS. The real story of aids—how it originated with a virus in a chimpanzee, jumped to one human, and then infected more than 60 million people—is very different from what most of us think we know.

Recent research has revealed dark surprises and yielded a radically new scenario of how AIDS began and spread. An audacious search for answers amid more than a century of data, The Chimp and the River tells the haunting tale of one of the most devastating pandemics of our time.

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Plucked: Chicken, Antibiotics, and How Big Business Changed the Way We Eat

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National Geographic #ad - Tracing its meteoric rise from scarce treat to ubiquitous global commodity, McKenna reveals the astounding role of antibiotics in industrial farming, documenting how and why "wonder drugs" revolutionized the way the world eats—and not necessarily for the better. In this eye-opening exposé, acclaimed health journalist and National Geographic contributor Maryn McKenna documents how antibiotics transformed chicken from local delicacy to industrial commodity—and human health threat—uncovering the ways we can make America's favorite meat safer again.

Consumed more than any other meat in the United States, chicken is emblematic of today's mass food-processing practices and their profound influence on our lives and health. Rich with scientific, and cultural insights, this spellbinding cautionary tale shines a light on one of America's favorite foods—and shows us the way to safer, historical, healthier eating for ourselves and our children.

Plucked: Chicken, Antibiotics, and How Big Business Changed the Way We Eat #ad - This book was previously published in hardcover with the title Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. In this riveting investigative narrative, McKenna dives deep into the world of modern agriculture by way of chicken: from the farm where it's raised directly to your dinner table.

. What you eat matters—for your health, for the environment, and for future generations.

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

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Broadway Books #ad - She was a poor southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine: The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, which are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.

. 1 new york times bestseller • “the story of modern medicine and bioethics—and, race relations—is refracted beautifully, indeed, and movingly. Entertainment weeklynow a major motion picture from hbo® starring oprah winfrey and rose byrne • one of the “most influential” cnn, “defining” lithub, and “best” the philadelphia inquirer books of the decade • winner of the chicago tribune heartland prize for nonfiction named one of the best books of the year by the new york times book review • entertainment weekly • O: The Oprah Magazine • NPR • Financial Times • New York • Independent U.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks #ad - K. Times U. K. Publishers weekly • library journal • kirkus reviews • Booklist • Globe and MailHer name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. Hela cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, viruses, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.

Yet henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave. Henrietta’s family did not learn of her “immortality” until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent.

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Deadly Companions: How Microbes Shaped our History Oxford Landmark Science

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OUP Oxford #ad - Dorothy H. Among the possible answers, one thing becomes clear: that for generations to come, our deadly companions will continue to shape human history. Oxford landmark science books are 'must-read' classics of modern science writing which have crystallized big ideas, and shaped the way we think. At the same time, our changing human culture has itself influenced the evolutionary path of microbes.

They have evolved and spread amongst us, shaping our culture through infection, disease, and pandemic. Ever since we started huddling together in communities, the story of human history has been inextricably entwined with the story of microbes. Crawford here shows that one cannot be truly understood without the other.

Deadly Companions: How Microbes Shaped our History Oxford Landmark Science #ad - Beginning with a dramatic account of the sars pandemic at the start of the 21st century, taking an up-to-date look at ancient plagues and epidemics, she takes us back in time to follow the interlinked history of microbes and man, and identifying key changes in the way humans have lived - such as our move from hunter-gatherer to farmer to city-dweller — which made us vulnerable to microbe attack.

Showing how we live our lives today — with increasing crowding and air travel — puts us once again at risk, Crawford asks whether we might ever conquer microbes completely, or whether we need to take a more microbe-centric view of the world.

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Introduction to Public Health

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Jones & Bartlett Learning #ad - Written in engaging, assessing, this best-selling text explains in clear terms the multi-disciplinary strategies and methods used for measuring, nontechnical language, and promoting public health. A thorough, accessible overview of the expanding field of public health for students new to its concepts and actors.

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The Mold in Dr. Florey's Coat: The Story of the Penicillin Miracle

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Henry Holt and Co. #ad - He reveals the reasons why credit for penicillin was misplaced, Florey, and why this astonishing achievement garnered a Nobel Prize but no financial rewards for Alexander Fleming, and his team. But it took a team of oxford scientists headed by Howard Florey and Ernst Chain four more years to develop it as the first antibiotic, and the most important family of drugs in the twentieth century.

In his wonderfully engaging book, acclaimed author Eric Lax tells the real story behind the discovery and why it took so long to develop the drug. The untold story of the discovery of the first wonder drug, the men who led the way, and how it changed the modern worldThe discovery of penicillin in 1928 ushered in a new age in medicine.

The Mold in Dr. Florey's Coat: The Story of the Penicillin Miracle #ad - . At once the world was transformed-major bacterial scourges such as blood poisoning and pneumonia, scarlet fever and diphtheria, gonorrhea and syphilis were defeated as penicillin helped to foster not only a medical revolution but a sexual one as well. Florey's coat is the compelling story of the passage of medicine from one era to the next and of the eccentric individuals whose participation in this extraordinary accomplishment has, until now, remained largely unknown.

The mold in Dr.

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The Doctors' Plague: Germs, Childbed Fever, and the Strange Story of Ignac Semmelweis Great Discoveries: Germs, Childbed Fever and the Strange Story of Ignac Semmelweis

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - While his simple reforms worked immediately—childbed fever in Vienna all but disappeared—they brought down upon Semmelweis the wrath of the establishment, and led to his tragic end. Riveting" houston chronicle, "captivating" Discover, and "compulsively readable" San Francisco Chronicle. Surgeon, scholar, best-selling author, Sherwin B.

The Doctors' Plague: Germs, Childbed Fever, and the Strange Story of Ignac Semmelweis Great Discoveries: Germs, Childbed Fever and the Strange Story of Ignac Semmelweis #ad - Ignác semmelweis is remembered for the now-commonplace notion that doctors must wash their hands before examining patients. Nuland tells the strange story of Ignác Semmelweis with urgency and the insight gained from his own studies and clinical experience. In mid-nineteenth-century Vienna, however, this was a subversive idea.

With deaths from childbed fever exploding, Semmelweis discovered that doctors themselves were spreading the disease.

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Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - 20 illustrations and a new introduction for this paperback edition. Laid out in 316 sections as carefully measured as a grid of tract houses, Holy Land is by turns touching, eerie, funny, and encyclopedic in its handling of what was gained and lost when thousands of blue-collar families were thrown together in the suburbs of the 1950s.

Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir #ad - An intensely realized and wholly original memoir about the way in which a place can shape a life, Holy Land; is ultimately about the resonance of choices--how wide a street should be, what to name a park--and the hopes that are realized in the habits of everyday life. In "quick, translucent prose" Michiko Kakutani, New York Times that is at once lyrical and unsentimental, D.

Waldie recounts growing up in Lakewood, California, a prototypical post-World War II suburb. Since its publication in 1996, Holy Land has become an American classic. J.

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